IMANTIS CARE SHEETS PAGE

Captive Bred Praying Mantis found all over the world!


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Mantis Species Care Information


Madagascan Green Mantis
African Mantis
Orchid Mantis
Giant Asian Mantis
Ghost Mantis
Budwing Mantis
Wide Armed Mantis
Gambian Boxer Mantis
Gambian Spotted-Eye Flower Mantis
Devil's Flower Mantis
Peruvian Stick Mantis
South American Green Mantis
Tarachodes sp.
Wahlbergii Mantis
Giant Shield Mantis
Idolomantis Diabolica
Deroplatys Dessicata (Dead Leaf Mantis)
Violin Mantis
Taiwan Flower Mantis
Asian Bark Mantis
Ant Mantis
Pnigomantis Medioconstricta
Texas Unicorn Mantis
Ceratomantis Saussurii
Indian Flower Mantis
Sybilla dolosa

 


MADAGASCAN GREEN MANTIS

Tarachomantis aloatrana The Madagascan Green mantis is a medium sized mantis reaching 3 inches long, and are medium in their bulkiness. Differing shades of green are the common color.
The unusual aspect of this mantis is that they grow to reach adulthood very fast, one of the fastest growing species in the world.

Food - The prey must have movement to trigger the hunt, so crickets, flies, moths, and butterflies are good choices.

Water - Right after hatching, and for the first month or so, the mantis nymph requires misting with water daily. From about the one month time to adulthood, mist every other day. Once adulthood is reached (the wings finally appear), you may reduce to twice per week.

Housing - Temperature should be about 75 degrees. Moisture-holding substrata will help keep the humidity at about 55% which is not only needed for successful molting, but this species needs humidity more than other mantis. A screen top for air also serves as the mantis’ favorite resting place. For molting, the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis to “crawl out of their skin.” This mantis is cannibalistic, so only one per container.

Difficulty - Medium in difficulty in the early stages, but easier to care for when misting is reduced to every other day/week.

Summary - The Madagascan Green Mantis is one of the most beautiful green mantis species.  

AFRICAN MANTIS
Sphodromantis lineola The African mantis is a medium-large mantis reaching 3 to 4 inches long with a bulky appearance. Colors can be tans, browns, and greens. This mantis is a hunter of its food, and will not hesitate to run after an escaping meal!

Food - The prey must have movement to trigger the hunt, so crickets, flies, moths, and butterflies are good food sources.

Water - Until the mantis reaches adulthood, spray every other day. Once the mantis reaches adulthood (the wings finally appear), the mantis will get most of the water from the food, so you may reduce spraying to about once every other week.

Housing - Temperature should be about 75 degrees, but this mantis can live in a wide range of temperatures, so indoors it typically needs no heat source. Humidity should be about 55% which will be needed for molting. A screen top for air also serves as the mantis’ favorite resting place. For molting, the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis for room to “crawl out of the old skin.” This mantis is cannibalistic, so only one per container.

Difficulty - This is the best mantis for a beginner because of the wide range of temperature it can endure, and the reduced watering needs.
Summary - If you want an aggressive, large, minimal care mantis that is a hunting machine, then the African Mantis is for you. If you want more information on Mantis, visit www.mantidforum.com. For supplies and mantis, visit www.mantisplace.com.

ORCHID MANTIS
Hymenopus coronatus is possibly the worlds’ most beautiful mantis, and the most sought after. It gets its name from sitting unnoticed amoung the Orchid flowers of Thailand. The colors of pink and white are impressive. Yet as a hatchling, the Orchid looks like a black and red fire ant!  

Food - The Orchid mantis wait for the food to come within reach, so flies are your best food source. Feed the flies honey and bee pollen to maximize natural food sources.  

Water - The Orchid mantis needs twice daily misting when young, once every other day at the L-3 to L4 stages, and 4 or 5  time a week as an adult (adults have wings).

Housing - Temperature should be about 85 degrees, humidity must be kept at 75 % by using moisture holding substrata, and good ventilation is required. The container should be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis.  

Difficulty - Lack of misting claims many young nymphs, but as adults, they are an easy species.
Summary - If it’s beauty you want-buy an Orchid.  

GIANT ASIAN MANTIS
Hierodula membranacea One of the largest mantis in the world, reaching 4 to 5 inches long! Colors range from green to brown. The Asian mantis is an ambusher, waiting for its food to come within reach, but will also stalk its prey at times.

Food - The prey must have movement to trigger the feeding so crickets, flies, moths, and butterflies, are good food sources.

Water - Every day mist the moisture- holding substrata.
Housing - Temperature should be about 75 degrees. Moisture-holding substrata will help keep the humidity at about 55% which will be needed for molting. A screen top for air also serves as the mantis’ favorite resting place. For molting, container height should be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis for room to “crawl out of their skin.” This mantis is cannibalistic, so only one per container.

Difficulty - This is one of the easiest mantis to care for, a great beginners mantis.

Summary - The Giant Asian Mantis is big and powerful, and is a super predator in the insect world.  


GHOST MANTIS
Phyllocrania paradoxa At 3 inches as an adult, you would miss this little camouflage expert in the wild. Colors range from dark brown to light green or golden.

Food - Ghost Mantis wait for their meals; The meal must come within reach. Flies are the best food source, but most adult females really like crickets.

Water - The ghost mantis needs misting every day, and is able to live in 60% humidity.

Housing - Temperature is about 80 degrees, although they are quite forgiving. The Ghost mantis can be housed together as cannibalism is not the rule. Have enough food and perching places available, and you have yourself a breeding colony!

Difficulty - Not a hard species to have at all, and the camouflage is unbelievable! Captive bred.

Summary - Incredible appearance, communal, and they don’t eat each other with an ample supply of feeder insects - what’s not to like about this species?

BUDWING MANTIS
Agrionina/affinis The Budwing Mantis is a large mantis reaching to about 4 inches, and very bulky in size. Typically the coloration is light browns to light gray tones. The females have very short stubby wings which is where the common name of Budwing originated.

FOOD - This mantis is not hard to feed at all! The Budwing mantis will eat just about any thing you put in the habitat. Crickets and flies are the most common feeder insects used in the raising of the Budwing. They will take mealworms, especially from forceps.

WATER - As an adult, mist the habitat every other day.

HOUSING - The ideal temperature is about 82 degrees, but at normal room temperature the Budwing will do fine. The lower the temperature, the less the mantis will eat and move around, but for normal growth and activity levels, keep the temperature about 82 degrees. Mantises need 2 to 3 times the length of their body to molt successfully. They literally crawl out of their skin, and need to have room to do this, or it will result in a bad molt, which leads to deformity or death. If the Budwing has wings the molting is completed, so there is no danger.

DIFFICULTY - The Budwing is a great beginner’s mantis, it is easy to care for and it gets big!

Summery - There are 4 mantis that I would recommend to beginners, and the Budwing is one of those.

WIDE ARMED MANTIS
Cilnia humeralis The Wide Armed Mantis is a medium sized mantis. Adult female is very bulky and has body length of around 2.5 to 3-inch while male adult is slender and about 2.5-inch in length. As the name implies its front arms are bigger in girth than most mantis species. The coloration is typically green or brown. But this species changes color several times especially after each molt.

Food - The wide armed mantis will eat house flies, crickets moths and butterflies.

Water - As nymphs the container must be misted daily. After the mantis turns adult (the wings appear) mist the container 3-34 times per week.

Housing - Temperature should be about 75-85 degrees. Moisture-holding substrata such as Perlite or Sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 60 % and above which is necessary for the molting process. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. This mantis is cannibalistic, so only one mantis per container. Provide some sticks in your cage too as this species likes hanging out on the twigs.

Difficulty - The Wide Armed Mantis is a fairly easy mantis to keep, and is a fairly aggressive feeder.

Summary - If you are looking for an impressive powerful looking hunter, the Wide Armed Mantis is for you!

Boxer Mantis                                                                                           OXYPILUS DISTINCTUS - This is a small flower mantis grows up to just 1 inch. They are originally from Gambia and resemble mantis with combination of Ceratomantis and boxer mantis, i.e. large raptorial arm with “Horns” on the head.

Food - The hatchling of this species is very small, so feed them small fruit flies from L1-L4, and move on to eat house flies, moths and butterflies when larger. This species is aggressive and will attack any prey.

Water- This species does not need frequent misting. 1-2 times every week is sufficient for nymphs from L1-L4, and only once a week is required after that but also a good idea to mist the surrounding when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc). After you spray once, if the mantis bends down to drink, spray a second time. If the mantis doesn't bend down, do not spray again for several days.

Housing - This species needs higher temperature at around 85 F but will be alright to keep them at 70-80F at night. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. It is always advisable to keep this species individually.

Difficulty - This species is not difficult to raise. Feed them mainly flying insects. They grow rather fast with sufficient food and warmth.

Summary - If you are looking for an exotic flower mantis, this is the mantis for you!


GAMBIAN SPOTTED-EYE FLOWER MANTIS
PSEUDOHARPAX VIRESCEN - This is a small flower mantis grows up to just 1 inch. They are originally from Gambia and has two “eyes” on the abdomen from dorsal view.

Food - The hatchling of this species is very small, so feed them small fruit flies from L1-L4, and move on to eat house flies, moths and butterflies when larger. This species is aggressive and will attack any prey.

Water - This species does not need frequent misting. 3-4 times every week is sufficient for nymphs from L1-L4, and only once a week is required after that but also a good idea to mist the surrounding when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc). After you spray once, if the mantis bends down to drink, spray a second time. If the mantis doesn't bend down, do not spray again for several days.

Housing - This species needs higher temperature at around 85 F but will be alright to keep them at 70-80F at night. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. It is always advisable to keep this species individually, but I have had much suscess keeping them together.

Difficulty - This species is not difficult to raise. Feed them mainly flying insects. They grow rather fast with sufficient food and warmth.

Summary - If you are looking for an exotic flower mantis, this is the mantis for you!

DEVIL’S FLOWER MANTIS
BLEPHAROPSIS MENDICA - The devil’s flower mantis grows up to about 2 -3 inches. This is a desert species with nice coloration, showing light green and white stripes.
Food - The hatchling of this species is very small, so feed them small fruit flies from L1-L4, and move on hydei fruit flies, house flies, crickets moths and butterflies when larger. This species is aggressive and will attack any prey.

Water - This species does not require frequent misting. Spray this species once every two weeks - It will get it's water from it's food.

Housing - This species needs higher temperature at around 85-95 F but will be alright to keep them at 70-80F at night. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. This species is very cannibalistic; it is always advisable to keep them individually.

Difficulty - This species is difficult to raise. Feed them mainly flying insects. They grow slowly and the final molt can take 3-4 weeks.

Summary - If you are looking for an exotic flower mantis, this is the mantis for you!


PERUVIAN STICK MANTIS                                                                  Pseudovates Peruviana - The Peruvian Stick is a medium sized mantis. As the name implies, it has slender body resembles a twig and blended well with its environment in the bush. The coloration is typically dark brown with two dark markings on its wings.  

Food - The Peruvian stick mantis will eat house flies, crickets moths and butterflies.

Water - This species does not need frequent misting. 2-3 times every week is sufficient for nymphs from L1-L4, and only once a week is required after that. It is also a good idea to mist the substratae when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc).

Housing - This species needs slightly lower temperature at around 75F but will be alright to keep them at 80F. Moisture-holding substrata such as Sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 60% which is necessary for the molting process. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. This species is fairly communal, you can keep a few together but always have sufficient food in the cage.

Difficulty - The Peruvian Stick mantis grows slightly slower than other tropical species but is a fairly easy mantis to keep.

Summary - If you are looking for a twig mimicking species with nice coloration, the Peruvian Stick mantis is for you!

SOUTH AMERICAN GREEN MANTIS
Oxyopsis gracilis The South American Green Mantis is a medium sized mantis, with the females reaching 3” in length, while the males reach about 1-1/2” in length. As the name implies the color of this species is typically green.

Food - The Peruvian Mantis will eat house flies, crickets, moths, and butterflies.

Water - As nymphs the container must be misted every other day. After the mantis turns adult (the wings appear) mist the container twice per week. As the nymph rejects food and begins to move slower, mist the container, as these are signs that the nymph is about to molt.

Housing - Temperature should be about 75 to 80 degrees.Moisture-holding substrata such as Sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 60% which is necessary for the molting process. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. This mantis is cannibalistic, so only one mantis per container.

Difficulty - The South American Mantis is a fairly easy mantis to keep.
Summary - If you are looking for a medium sized green tropical mantis, the South American Mantis is for you!

Bark Mantis
Tarachodes sp. The Tarachodes Mantis grows to be about 2” in length, in both the male and female.. The coloration is the outstanding trait of this species, as it is one of the few mantids that look just like tree bark.

Food - The Tarachodes Mantis will eat fruit flies as a young nymph, and as an adult prefers flies, moths, and butterflies.

Water - As nymphs, the container must be misted every 1-2 times per week. After the mantis turns adult (the wings appear) mist the container twice per week. After you spray once, if the mantis bends down to drink, spray a second time. If the mantis doesn't bend down,  spray again the next day.

Housing - Temperature should be about 78 degrees. Moisture-holding substrata such as Sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 70 % which is necessary for the molting process. This species needs branches to camouflage themselves. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. This mantis is cannibalistic, so only one mantis per container.

Difficulty -The Tarachodes Mantis is medium in it’s difficulty level. When supplying branches, be sure there is enough room for molting if the mantis hangs from the branch. This will probably require a larger enclosure, and creative branch attaching.

Summary -The Tarachodes Mantis is one of the most unusual colored species available. If you like the challenge of setting up a unique enclosure, take on Tarachodes!

Wahlbergii Mantis
Pseudocreobotra wahlbergii The Wahlbergii Mantis is known by several names: Wahlbergii, Spiny Flower Mantis, and also the #9 Mantis due to the wing markings looking like the number nine. The #9 Mantis is a smaller sized mantis, with the females reaching 1-1/2 inches, and the males reaching 1-1/4 inches. The coloration is a collage of green stripes and spots of color that help it blend in with the flowers it ambushes prey on. The # 9 on the back is bright yellow, and possibly mirrors a large eye to ward off predators.

Food -The #9 Mantis is a “waiter” not a stalker. Flying food is best, if not mandatory. When first born, fruit flies, and then houseflies and blue bottle flies as the mantis can handle the size.

Water - The #9 Mantis gets most of its liquid from its food, but the need for high humidity will require misting into a moisture holding substrata, like Sphagnum moss. Misting 2 to 3 times per week is best.

Housing - Temperature should be about 80 degrees. Moisture-holding substrata such as Sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 65 % which is necessary for the molting process. This mantis likes to hang and ambush, so twigs for hanging are a good idea. Due to the high humidity, good ventilation is required to keep bacterial infections from forming, which will kill the mantis. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. This mantis is cannibalistic, so only one mantis per container.

Difficulty -The #9 Mantis is a more difficult mantis to keep, due to the high humidity levels required, which can easily cause bacterial infections. Breeding is more difficult with this species, and temperatures of 80 degrees may be hard to maintain.

Summary -The #9 Mantis is one of the most beautifully colored species available. If you are looking for a challenge, this is the mantis for you!

Giant Shield Mantis
Rhombodera sp. - The Giant Shield Mantis lives up to its name with extended thorax mimicking a leaf in the wild and blend in well in the bush. The female mantis grows to about 3" long (8cm). The coloration is a green body and blue hue on the head, which is very unusual.

Food - The Giant Shield Mantis nymphs feed on fruit flies as hatchlings, and will move on to house flies and small crickets after 3-4 molts, and blue bottles or other flying insects when larger. Thus species is a feeding machine, so plenty of food needs to be available before cannibalism kicks in.

Water - This species requires 60-70% humidity, so spraying once  a
day will be necessary, with Sphagnum moss as a substrata. Good
ventilation is essential.

Housing - The Giant Shield Mantis likes branches with leaves to hang on as they do in the wild. the cage needs three times the length of the mantis. Temperature should be about 80°-90F.

Difficulty - This species is not difficult to keep, but appears to be a
challenge in breeding. Also, cannibalism is very common for this
aggressive species.

Summary - If you are looking for a exotic leaf-like mantis, the giant
shield mantis fits the bill!

Giant Devils Flower Mantis or Idol care sheet

Idolmantis diabolica - The Giant Devils Flower Mantis is (we think!) is
the most impressive of the flower mantids. With white, burgundy,
brown, and green colorations, it is stunning.
Diabolica is a larger sized mantis, with sexual differences in two areas;
the females have six to seven abdomen segments, the males eight
and the antennae of the male are feathery and split, while the females
are thin and straight. Both male and female adults have full wings.

Food - Diabolica is a flower mantis, so flying food is required, as they do not tend to hunt ground prey. Some have reported feeding crickets can result in females laying infertile ooths. From L1 the mantis will eat Hydei fruit flies; by L2 stable house flies, they will move onto houseflies and blue bottle flies as well as larger flying insects. Be sure to feed the flies honey or yens blend
before feeding the mantis as the better your feeders are the healthier the mantis will be.

Water - Until adulthood, when molts are finished, spray the mantis enclosure to maintain a 70-85% humidity in the am and again at night, good humidity level when molting is important. The humidity helps to soften the skin. Once adult, once a day misting is required.

Housing - The enclosure needs adequate height for molting; three times the length of the mantis. Diabolica will sit in the same place for days, so perching branches are a good addition, as silk flowers, which will replicate the environment mantis lives in, and are non-toxic. & easily bleached & cleaned. The temperature should be about 80-90F and can take a night drop of 75-80F. A substrate of sphagnum moss will help keep humidity levels up.

Difficulty - Not for beginners. Breeding and incubating ootheca is more difficult than other mantis.
Molting prior to adulthood is still a challenge to many in the hobby.
Summary - The Idolomantis diabolica is probably the most sought after mantis in the world due to it's large size, amazing colorations.
 If you are hooked on raising mantids, this has got to end up in your collection!!


Dead Leaf Mantis/Lobata
Deroplyats dessicata - The Dead Leaf Mantis lives up to its name with various shades of browns and patterning just like a dead leaf. This mantis is a larger size with an extended shield on thorax, and when frightened, will drop to the ground and play dead! When frightened, the Dead Leaf Mantis will place it's forearms on it's head and spread it's wings.

Food - The dead leaf mantis nymph will move to the larger hydei fruit flies almost immediately, due to their large hatchling size. This species is similar to ghost and violin mantids in that it tends to wait for food rather than stalk it. Therefore flies are the best food source, but occasionally, crickets can be offered.

Water - This species requires 70% humidity, so spraying once a day will be necessary, with Sphagnum moss as a substrata.

Housing - The dead leaf likes branches to hang on, and dead leafs on those branches would replicate what the mantis would do in the wild. Since this mantis gets so long, remember the container needs three times the length of the mantis. Temperature should be about 80°F.

Difficulty - Some sources say this mantis is easy, others difficult. If you don't mind misting and keeping 80°F as a temperature, this mantis is average difficulty. (This species is also vulnerable when it comes to molting, and can go on without food many days after molting.)

Summary - If you are looking for a large, cryptic mantis, the Dead Leaf Mantis fits the bill!
 

Violin Mantis
Gongylus gongylodes - The Violin Mantis grows up to about 4-5 inches and is one of the largest species. This species has nice rust/brown coloration. The elongated thorax really creates an unusual look. This is where the name Violin Mantis is originated.

Food - The Violin Mantis is a master of catching flying insects, which is why you should feed them mainly flies. The hatchling of this species is very large with long legs, feed them Hydei fruit flies from L1-L2, and move on to house flies, Blue Bottle flies, moths, and butterflies when larger. This species is one of the few communal species.

Water - This species does not require constant misting, but keep humidity at 50%. Sphagnum moss is a good substrata.

Housing - This species requires temperature at around 85-100°(F) during the day, and around 80° (F) at night. The container needs to be two to three times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. As this is a communal species, you can keep a group of them in the same cage but do not overcrowd the enclosure.

Difficulty - This species is not for a beginner as it needs plenty of heat and specific food requirements. They require flying insects as they tend to wait for their prey to come in reach.. They grow slowly and the final molt can take 3-4 weeks. (High temperature of 100F is required to initiate mating).

Summary - If you are looking for an exotic and unusual mantis, this is the one for you!

Taiwan Flower Mantis
Acromantis Farmosana - The Taiwan flower mantis grows up to about 1-1.5 inches. This is the only Acromantis species from Taiwan. They are skittish species but nice brown color. Female can be identify with pointy wing at the end (near abdomen).

Food - The hatchling of this species is small and feed on fruit flies from L1-L3, and move on to house flies, medium size crickets, moths and butterflies when larger (L5/l6 and above). They prefer flying insects.

Water - This species need misting once every 2 days but ventilation is important for this species to keep them healthy.

Housing - This species needs moderately higher temperature at around 85 F but will be alright to keep them at 70-80F at night. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. It is always advisable to keep them individually.

Difficulty - This species is not too difficult to rear. Feed them mainly flying insects. They grow very fast with plenty of food and warmth.

Summary - If you are looking for an exotic flower mantis, this is the mantis for you!

Asian Bark Mantis
Theopompa Ophthalmica - This is a medium size bark mantis grows up to about 2 inches. They can be found around Eastern and South East Asia. Very colorful mantis with nice color stripe on the body for camouflage purpose during nymphs stage. They also appear to be a nocturnal species prefer to feed later in the afternoon.

Food - The hatchling of this species is very small but bulky, so feed them small fruit flies from L1-L4, and move on to stick mantis will eat house flies, moths and crickets when larger. This species is moderate in aggressiveness and feed sparingly.

Water - This species needs frequent misting. 1-2 times everyday is required for nymphs from L1-L4, and once every other day is required after that but also a good idea to mist the surrounding when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc). This species required a higher humidity.

Housing - This species needs lower temperature at around 75 F. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. It is always advisable to keep this species individually. Tree bark is also required in the cage as this species does not climb the plastic or glass wall very well.

Difficulty - This species required additional care and is not recommended for beginner

Summary - If you are looking for an exotic and colorful bark mantis, this is the mantis for you!

East Asian Ant Mantis - Odontomantis Planiceps
Odontomantis planiceps - This is a small mantis grows up to just 1 inch. They are originally from East Asia and nymphs resembles little ant.

Food - The hatchling of this species is very small, so feed them small fruit flies from L1-L4, and move on to stick mantis will eat house flies, moths, crickets, and samll butterflies when larger. This species is aggressive and will attack any prey.

Water - This species need frequent misting, 1-2 times everyday is necessary for nymphs from L1-L4, and only once every other day after that but also a good idea to mist the surrounding when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc).

Housing - This species needs higher temperature at around 85 F but will be alright to keep them at 70-80F at night. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. It is always advisable to keep this species individually.

Difficulty - This species is not difficult to raise. They are eager eaters and not choosy on prey. They grow rather fast with sufficient food and warmth.

Summary - If you are looking for an aggressive mantis with ant appearance, this is the mantis for you!

Pnigomantis Medioconstricta
Pnigomantis medioconstricta This is one of the most colorful mantids to come out of Indonesia, specifically the Island of Flores. The females grow to 4 inches in length, and both sexes have brown as the main color, but the nymphs are much brighter in both green and brown colorations. Nymphs seem to be more prone to green colorations when the humidity is kept high.

Food - This species has large overall size, and is aggressive in feeding. The female eats small vertebrates without hesitation! Feeding can be quite entertaining; this mantis will stalk and pounce.

Water - This species can be watered 4 to 5 times a week, and every day as nymphs.

Housing - Temperature should be about 85 degrees, with humidity about 45%. Split siblings before L3, or cannibalism will be the rule, not the exception.

Difficulty - Very easy species to keep, be sure to give enough vertical room to molt.

Summary - Pnigomantis medioconstricta are an entertaining feeder, brightly colored as nymphs, and have bulky size, all good traits!


Texas Unicorn Mantis
PHYLLOVATES CHLOROPHAEA - The popular native species of the USA grows up to about 3 inches. This is a species found only near Southern Texas bordering Mexico. It is one of the two species of native mantis that grow “horn” on the head (the other is Arizona unicorn mantis).

Food - The hatchling of this species is very active, they are not skittish species and able to handle prey the size of their body. Feed them fruit flies from L1-L3, and move on to house flies, crickets moths and butterflies when larger. This species is a good feeder and will attack any prey.

Water - This species need misting once every day but ventilation is important for this species to keep them healthy.

Housing - This species needs moderately higher temperature at around 85-90 F but will be alright to keep them at 70-80F at night. The container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. This species is a communal species and you can keep a group of them in a large net as long as it is not too crowded.

Difficulty - This species is not too difficult to rear. Feed them mainly flying insects. They grow very fast with plenty of food and warmth. Adult male is vulnerable to female’s attack during courtship, so just make sure that female has plenty of food before pairing up an adult pair.

Summary - If you are looking for an exotic native mantis, this is the mantis for you!

Ceratomantis saussurii
Ceratomantis saussurii - is another fascinating small mantis from Indonesia (Central Thailand). Adult females and males grow up to 1 inch in length. Freshly hatched nymphs L1 are 2-3 mm in length. Nymphs in all stages are milky white/brown. Adult mantids are white with brown and black spots on their bodies. Males are capable to fly. Mantids in all stages are using their front legs to communicate with each other or to scare off any
kind of predator.

Food - Nymphs L1-L2 are big enough to capture fruit flies. Adult mantids can capture insects that are at least their own size. Those include flies, moths, crickets etc.

Water - since those species live in the tropical forest in Indonesia mantids in all stages need to be sprayed at least 3-4 times a week.
Housing - Temperature should be about 75-90 degrees. Moisture-holding substrata will help keep the humidity at about 60-80% which is needed for successful molting. A screen top for air also serves as the mantis' favorite resting place. For molting, the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis to "crawl out of their skin." Nymphs L1-L3 can be keep together but in L4 all nymphs should be separated, one mantis per container.

Difficulty - Medium in difficulty to keep. If you breed any other flower mantid you can try to get few nymphs Ceratomantis saussurii.
Summary - Ceratomantis saussurii is a really amazing species of mantids to watch, much more interesting than any other small species of mantids because of their amazing behavior.

Indian Flower Mantis
Creobroter gemmatus - The Indian Flower Mantis is a smaller mantis with the adult females reaching about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in length, the males are slightly smaller. Both male and female are green and white with a distinctive yellow spot encircled in black on the back that looks like a large eye. It is believed this is a defense against predators. The wings under the cover wings are an intense red with black, and when displayed, this is an awesome color show! The young nymphs are colored in red, brown, and black, which disguises them to look like fire ants or assassin bugs.

Food - The nymphs are small and will eat Melanogaster fruit flies in L1/L2, and will move on to Hydei fruit flies about L3/L4. Being a flower mantis, the "wait for my dinner" approach requires you have insects that come to the mantis, not ground crawlers. The best food source is house flies and blue bottle flies, and any butterflies or moths will be eaten immediately as well.

Water - This species comes from the rain forests of Indonesia, so high humidity is required. Nymphs should be misted lightly twice a day as L1/L2, and once a day until adulthood. As adults once every other day should be adequate.

Housing - This species requires higher temperatures than many other species, around 85 degrees ( 30 Celsius). Breeders report that Nymphs can be kept up to L4 in group housing, but I would suggest splitting them into their own containers by L3. Be sure the height of the container is 2 to 3 times the length of the mantid when it hangs from it's back legs, to facilitate molting.

Difficulty - With the exception of the misting requirements as nymphs, this species is not difficult to raise.

Summary - This species has some of the brightest colors when displaying. It is a small flower mantis, but a great addition to any keepers collection.

Sybilla dolosa
Sybilla dolosa - The Sybilla dolosa is one of the most amazing looking of the mantis species. The wings are a bright green and are shaped in a perfect oval. The rest of the mantis is dark brown, which gives it great contrast. The females reach about 2 inches (5 centimeters), the males are slightly smaller. The body is SKINNY with grows at the leg joints that look like dead leaves-impressive!

Food - As with most mantids, the nymphs will be on the 2 sizes of fruit flies, and then progress to house flies and blue bottle flies.

Water - Nymphs should be sprayed twice a day in L1/L2, and once a day L3 to adulthood. After adulthood, once every 2 days should be enough.

Housing - This species is a communal species, and can exist together without cannibalism. That being said, any "communal" species will cannibalize given lack of food/room. As always give enough room to molt. The enclosure should have branches and leaves, as ooths are laid on the leaves regularly. Temperature should be 80 degrees ( 26 Celsius ), and humidity should be kept high, about 80%.

Difficulty - This is a very skinny dainty mantid, and when young, can be easily lost in the container, especially if you use moss as a substrata! The food accordingly must be smaller, it will be several instars before house flies can be introduced.

Summary - Exotic, cryptic, weird, this mantis has it all!!





 

 



 

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